June 15, 1925 - June 20, 1925

One False Step!June 15, 1925



Good-Bye, Forever!June 16, 1925



Missing and MissedJune 17, 1925


Innocents AbroadJune 18, 1925



Breakfast for TwoJune 19, 1925



A Cruel WorldJune 20, 1925


Transcripts

One False Step!June 15, 1925

Panel 1

Downstairs Voice: Won’t you come in?

Mr. Neek: Thanks

Ella: Life is terrible! Can you beat it? Here I meet a man who makes Rudy Vaselino look like Ben Turpin and I don’t dare face him. I’m through telling fibs! From now on my name is Ella George Washington Cinders!

Panel 2

Ella: Maybe curiosity did kill a cat, but I must hear what they’re saying! He’s asking Mrs. Cinders if Gwendolyn Beverly lives here – she says she never heard of her. He -

Panel 4

Mr. Neek: Gwendolyn Beverly!

Mytie: Gwendolyn nothing! She’s my stepdaughter and a very inefficient maid of all work!

Lotta: Tee hee! Ella you look so funny!

Prissie: Why Ella, I didn’t know you were an acrobat!

Good-Bye, Forever!June 16, 1925

Panel 1

When O. Watters Neek discovered that Gwendolyn Beverly, supposed society girl, was really only little Ella Cinders, kitchen mechanic, he seemed to lose all interest in her, and Lotta and Prissie are now doing their best to make her life more miserable.

Panel 2

Prissie: Oh, look at the society girl art student! She’s just dashing off a little water color work!

Lotta: Tee hee! My, dear Miss Beverly, how scrubbing floors does interfere with one’s social duties!

Panel 3

Mytie: So you are screen struck, you little idiot! These silly movie acting lessons are the cause of your ridiculous behavior and that’s why I’m destroying them! Let me hear any more out of it and I’ll put you on bread and water for a week!

Ella: Oh, please don’t tear them up!

Panel 4

Ella: I wish I had never been born! All I get is trouble in oversized doses. Well, this settles it! I’ve stood for a whole lot, but I can be pushed just so far, and when she tore up those lessons I made up my mind that after today, Ella, the Ally Cat, is going to be known as Ella, the “Tiger Woman!” I’ll show her!!

Panel 5

Ella: Good bye, old kitchen! The cage door’s open and this li’l canary’s flying away! I’m going to let the old lady get acquainted with you for a change.

Blackie: Say Ella, before we run away lemme sprinkle some tacks in Mrs. Cinders’ bed, will ya?

Missing and MissedJune 17, 1925

Panel 1

Mr. Neek: To think of Gwendolyn Beverly being only a mere servant. I was certainly taken in by that girl. I’ll wire the chief now that she’s not the girl we want.

Panel 2

Before Ella ran away she didn’t seem to her stepfamily any more important than a snowflake in a blizzard, but now -

Panel 3

Mytie: After the wonderful way I’ve treated that nasty little Ella, now I’m rewarded by this ingratitude. Look at those dishes! It’s enough to make a person go on a diet! Well – there’s only one answer!

Panel 4

Mytie: Come on girls, snap out of your negligees into your house-aprons! Mother’s going to start a domestic science course of her own and you two will be her star pupils! To the kitchen – forward march!

Prissie: How vulgar!

Lotta: I can just feel one of my sick headaches coming on!

Panel 5

Where is Ella? No one has seen her since she ran away! Is she cold and hungry, wandering the streets of the great city with no place to sleep, or has she found safety and happiness away from her heartless stepmother?

Innocents AbroadJune 18, 1925

Panel 1

Ella: Here we are with no more home than a couple of raindrops. I don’t suppose we could get a room in there for less than three bucks a week.

Panel 2

Stranger: Excuse me, but I overheard you. This hotel is so swell that they tax you four bits for a toothpick, but I and the manager are as thick as a Hottentot‘s hair. If you give me your money I’ll get you a place to sleep cheap enough.

Panel 3

Stranger: Now you wait right on those steps over there until I come out!

Ella: I won’t forget you for doing this.

Panel 4

Milkman: Well, – here’s where I do the white thing.

Breakfast for TwoJune 19, 1925

Panel 1

Because the old man took her money, – Ella is now flatter than a duck’s instep.

Panel 2

Ella: Wake up Blackie. It’s morning! Ho, hum! – Well, there’s one good thing about sleeping outdoors, I don’t have to make any beds.

Panel 3

Ella: I’ll never trust a man with fuzzy whiskers again! If his face was like his heart he could play in a minstrel show without any makeup!

Blackie: Where’s breakfast?

Panel 4

Ella: All we get for breakfast is poached air on toast, – without the toast. Until I get a job our menu will be as slim as a dowager’s dream of a “boyish figure.”

Blackie: Oh – Look what the cow left!

Panel 5

Ella: This tastes better to me than water does to Volstead. The old man swipes our dough but someone leaves breakfast for us. Well, life is just a game of put and take.

A Cruel WorldJune 20, 1925

Panel 1

Ella: If it’s true there’s a job for every one in the world, mine’s been waiting a long time for me. Meet me here at six o’clock.

Blackie: Will I meet some eats here too?

Panel 2

Ella: This town has more streets than the Rockies have rocks, and how well my feet know it! Here it is afternoon and I’m still as free from work as a frog is from feathers!

Panel 3

Ella: Broke, hungry, homeless and jobless! That’s us, Blackie. The only job I didn’t try for today was model in a noodle factory!

Blackie: I’m so empty I echo!

Panel 4

Ella: I’m as discouraged as the hen that saw the ostrich egg. What’ll we do, Blackie – go home and get licked, or stick it out and eat static?

Blackie: Uh-huh!


Notes


1. Rudy VaselinoRudolf Valentino, an actor whose image inspired the term “Vaselino,” for a guy with perfectly slicked-back hair.

Rudolf Valentino

2. Ben TurpinA silent film comedian famous for his crossed eyes.

Ben Turpin

3. George WashingtonAccording to legend, he chopped down his father’s cherry tree at age six and, when confronted, confessed saying “I cannot tell a lie…”
4. HottentotThe Khoikhoi people of Southern Africa.
5. VolsteadAndrew Volstead, a Republic Representative from Minnesota, whose name is most closely associated with the Volstead Act, or National Prohibition Act of 1919, banning intoxicating beverages until 1933.